Sep 292016
 

IMG_5127 IMG_5123

I was invited to the Harvest Festival at The Sylvester Manor on Shelter Island one of the most glorious weekends this year.

About a dozen or so EZ-UP, pop-up tents manned by local vendors and food artisans offered up various delicacies from smoked turkey or brisket sandwiches, brick oven grilled pizza, all organic – kale, sweet potato & chic pea style soups and coleslaw to local wines, squashes, and Sylvester Manor eggs, husk tomatoes, breads, flower wreaths and cutting boards. The tents lined one edge of the farm’s ‘center field’ where a small stage was platform to a number of folk acts that played the last few hours of the weekend’s festivities.

My friend’s blanket was laid out just to the right of the EZ-UP tent where the ‘sound board’ was in the center of the ‘center field’.  As we were finishing lemonades and kettle chips and getting into our sweatshirts as the warm sun set for the day when another friend showed up w/a brown paper bag half full of husk tomatoes, grown on The Sylvester Manor farm. No sooner had he sat down when I had one of these yellow marble sized morsels pinched from it’s husk in my mouth. OOoos, ahas and yums drifted and filled our space as hands of adults and kids dove into that bag with little restraint.

Husk Tomatoes or Ground Cherries look like a mini heirloom tomatoes but taste like a cherry and tomato mixed into one bite. Pretty Dlectable if you ask me. Immediately I thought to myself, “this would make one killer tomato jam.” One of my all time favorite delicacies.

Concerned that the two pint baskets I got would yield very little I thought adding my next favorite delicacy, Peppadews, would bulk up the yield while also adding so much to the flavor and body of the jam on a whole.

After photographing these most gorgeous and interesting husk tomatoes or ground cherries for way to long I got that sauce pot on the stove.

What I used:

2-3 T of olive oil – enough to coat the bottom of a pot with a thin coating of oil.

1 T mustard seeds

1 t of red pepper flakes

3 good sized garlic dents – minced & sliced

2 baskets of Husk Tomatoes – husked & washed – some cut in half

6 – 8 Peppadews – sliced and good splash of their liquid

1/2″ fresh ginger root – finely grated

2T tomato paste,

1-2 T sugar and or maple syrup.

What to do:

Add the red pepper flakes, mustard seeds, garlic and ginger to the olive oil heating over a medium to low heat to infuse the oil with these savory flavors. Then I added the washed husk tomatoes and the sliced Peppadews and their liquid. Stir well, lower the heat.

If the mixture might be to spicy which it was the first time I made it, it can be toned down by added the juice of a wedge of lime, a bit more sugar or the maple syrup.  I also added some freshly ground nutmeg*

*Nutmeg is hardly a staple ingredient but I keep it around because a sangha member who’s authored a book on natural healing mentioned my using nutmeg when he noticed I was trying to suppress my cough during a Dharma teaching.

This Husk Tomato/Ground Cherry Jam is about the best conDiment to serve this time of year if you ask me. It’s a real trick or treat, sweet yet with a nice spicy bite at the same time & boy does the color work. It’s great as a topping on baked potatoes, scrambled eggs, on buttered toast of any kind, and any protein.  Make it, it’s great. A little goes a long way.

Share This:

Dec 282013
 

The New York Times Dining/food section appeared at the end of my couch made bed in Tiburon, CA, Christmas Morning. What a great ‘issue’. The hazelnut crusted sable is top on my list to try when I return home  as well as each of the Egg for Every Occasion recipes.  Then, towards the back of the section, Melissa Clark’s piece on the Spanish Tortilla.  I can’t help but to share my piece & recipe with you, which I must admit, I like very much and hope you will too. Video in the works.

I often pride myself on not being an addictive personality but the exact opposite is true when it came to, comes to, making & eating Spanish Tortilla, on this side of the pond.  After stumbling upon an article raving about the food lover’s Williamsburg, over a year ago now, highlighting The Bedford Cheese shop & the sandwich shop, Saltie I began to plan my Williamsburg assault.

The Bedford Cheese shop is a gastronomic play land. A no brainer for any foodD to visit & relish.  The Saltie menu of  7 sandwiches seem to take their inspiration from each of our earthly continents. They are thoughtfully created and curated if you will.  I plunged, with way less restraint than anybody else in the tiny space, into the Spanish Armada, a perfectly made, chock full of potato Spanish tortilla on a half foot square of fresh focaccia topped with pimentón aioli. I cut the sandwich in half, Dvoured one half sitting at the counter and wrapped up the other half wich,(I like the pun here) I savored at home while researching how to make a Spanish tortilla. Knowing what I know now I’ll want a flotilla behind me in support of all the beautiful food I’m so inspired to make with these downright simple, earth bound foods.

My recipe yields are for 1-2 people as they’re usually tests. Most recipes call for twice the ingredients I work with.

Spanish Tortilla

You’ll need:

A non-stick pan, potatoes, salt, oil, eggs, onion, aioli or mayo and paprika. I forgot to include the bottle of olive oil in this picture and  it should be because it’s the olive oil & seemingly large amount called for that ‘makes’ a proper Spanish Tortilla.

Most recipes call for 6-7 potatoes, any potato will do, russet, Idaho, Yukon, Bliss, to 5 eggs. Melissa Clark’s calls for 5 potatoes to 6 eggs. I used about 1 pound of small, tri-colored roasting potatoes I had around, half an onion diced and 3 eggs.

One of the key technique to making a Spanish Tortilla is how the potatoes are cut.  Cut the potato in half, length-wise. With the flat side down on a cutting surface, slice across the top of the potato halves slices that are about 1/8” thick.  No normal person would slice potatoes the size I used and truth be told, regular white potatoes look nicer and are far easier to work with. The tri- colored potatoes look exciting in the photos.

The onion is diced.

There are a number of cooking techniques that make a Spanish tortilla all that it is and not just a potato omelet.

1.   The sliced potatoes and diced onions are salted and should be allowed to rest for 5-10 minutes before adding them to enough heated oil that they will be covered in the pan. 

2.   You cook the potatoes and onions in a good amount of oil for about 15-20 minutes, until they become tender but do not get any color.

3.   The cooked potatoes & onions are then strained over a bowl, retaining the olive oil, then added to hand beaten or whisked eggs.

4.   Mix the cooked potatoes, onions and egg mixture and pour this into the non-stick pan you cooked the potatoes, onions in.

A few recipes call for up to 2-3Cs of oil.  I used just enough oil to cover the potato, onion mixture when spread evenly over the bottom of the pans surface. Cook the potatoes, onions until they can be split with a fork or spoon.

I then added the cooked potatoes, onions and oil to the beaten eggs. I mixed this well then poured it back into the pan that I melted about 1 Tablespoon of goat butter on to and a good amount of the reserved olive oil the potatoes & onions were cooked in.

A trick I learned is that the 1st minute of cooking time with the egg, potato, onion mixture must be very hot for the egg to not stick. Then you can cook the tortilla over a medium high heat until you see the edges pull away from the side of the pan. The middle will still be runny but when you can lift a side up and get a spatula well under it, it’s time to do the ol flip-a-roo Don’t fear it. Place a dinner plate over the top of the pan, stand over the sink and FLIP.

Put the pan back on the stove, heat for 20-30 seconds add a bit more oil and slide the tortilla back into the pan. Cook this for another 3-4 minutes, turn off the heat and let it sit for about 2 minutes before flipping it back onto a serving plate.

It’s highly likely the tortilla will split on the first flip. Worry not this is not the ‘presentation side’ and and once the tortilla is back in the pan all mistakes seem to work themselves out. You may also forego the flipping stage and finish the tortilla off in the oven, at 375 for 5-7 minutes.

The creme de la creme here is not the crema Catalana that I tried to make but the pimentón aioli. Fortunately it can be made quickly by adding paprika to good quality mayonnaise. I look forward to making the pimentón aioli from scratch. This is a true delicacy and comfort food at the same time. I feel it an appropriate share as 2013 which I know was tough for many comes to a close and a clean slate is before us as we approach the New Year.

IMG_4469

 

Share This:

Oct 042013
 

Karashi-Mentaiko/Spicy Pollock Roe in cream sauce over angel hair pasta

If the title hasn’t intimidated or scared you away, you’re a special one and we’ll be rockin on. I’m thrilled to share a fabulous dish that takes minutes to cook and costs less than $3 per serving.

Hiroko, the woman I work with, told me she made her daughter’s favorite dish the other night because she won a Naginata championship. Katie is a champion in various Japanese marshal arts but Naginata is her absolute passion.

“So what’s Katie’s favorite dish” “Karashi Mentaiko, it’s spicy codfish roe in a cream sauce over angel hair pasta.” Now I did a full body spin around and said, “Wait, I love that dish. I order something like that at Typhoon, the hugely popular Japanese lounge in the E. Village. (which only recently is no longer)

Hiroko tells me the dish is so easy to make and it takes no time at all.  Inspired by her instructions and her daughter’s taste buds I was determined to make the dish myself. Later that afternoon I joined Hiroko on her weekly grocery-shopping trip to Sunrise Mart, the Japanese specialty Mart in the E.Village, so she could show me exactly which codfish roe to use. It’s called Karashi-mentaiko in Japanese.  For English-speaking-me: spicy Pollock roe. I paid $7.50 for a package with 2 large pieces/sacs of the Karashi-Mentaiko.

I was tripped up by one of the ingredients Hiroko used because I don’t typically cook with cream or milk for that matter. Then I thought to myself, I have fabulous whole milk yogurt from Trader Joes, I’m gonna try and make it with that.

If it weren’t for the somewhat tedious exercise of scraping the roe out of the very thin membrane sacks the roe is in and the 9-10 minutes it takes to cook dried spaghetti or 3-4 minutes for angel hair, this dish would honestly take no more than 5-6 minutes to prepare. A new SpecialD for sure

removing karashi from membrane sacks

.

WHAT YOU’LL USE

1/4# – Angel hair or spaghetti – Use organic pasta that is made from semolina, whole durum wheat. I suggest no longer using enriched pasta.

2 sacks of spicy Pollack roe, (Karashi mentaiko or non spicy is called tarako)

2 T butter or olive oil

2 t Tamari or soy sauce – optional

2 T – cream or whole milk yogurt

For Garnish:

Dried nori cut into thin strips, scallion slices, chiffonade shisho leaf, an edible leaf in the basil & mint family, alfalfa or radish sprouts

WHAT YOU’LL DO:

Bring 5-6 quarts of salted water to a rolling boil.

While the water is coming to a boil, slit the roe sac length wise and scoop the roe out with a spoon onto a plate. Discard the membrane.

In a saucepan over a medium heat, add the olive oil or melt the butter, add the tamari or soy sauce. Turn the heat off and mix in the roe and whisk to break up any clumping of the roe.

This is where I substituted the yogurt for cream. I used about 2 heaping Tablespoons and whisked everything together, making a lovely sauce.

At about this time the water should have come to a rolling boil. Add the desired amount of pasta and cook until your desired tenderness. If you’re using angel hair 3 minutes is perfect. If you’re using standard spaghetti, 9 – 10 minutes. Reserve at least 1/2 C of the cooking liquid. drain the pasta and add it to the pan of codfish roe sauce immediately – still dripping from the cooking liquid is fine .  Stir in the sauce pan to coat the pasta well.

Place in bowls and garnish with any of the suggested toppings or anything you may choose or have around.

Enjoy. It’s Dlicious, it’s Dlightful, its Delctable.

Share This:

Feb 272012
 


I didn’t have much on my agenda for today but to prepare something to bring to my friend’s Oscar watching party and buffet. A happening we now describe as a tradition.

I made a Spanish Tortilla for breakfast thinking this would be perfect to bring but ended up eating half of it throughout the day once I learned my friend was already serving a potato dish. I gotta say,  I’m really perfecting the Spanish Tortilla each time I make one now. See entry below.

Sure I could bring a bottle of wine but I really wanted to bring something I made, good for casual eats, finger food buffet, easy to make and  transport, healthful,  Dlicious and fun.  I can’t say popcorn for an Oscar party is any surprise but mine was! I was happy to have our spicy, flavorful popcorn to talk about because that ceremony left quite a bit to Dsire.  I got more ooos and ahhs then Billy Crystal did. Maybe you’ll try making this:   Freshly popped corn in olive oil topped with Salt of D Earth, curry powder, golden raisins & dried cranberries I whipped up, spiced up, embellished and pour out into  a brown paper bag shook that up and was on my .

Share This:

Feb 262012
 

After stumbling upon an article raving about the food lover’s Williamsburg, highlighting The Bedford Cheese shop & Saltie I thought for sure they would be perfect candidates to make a Salt of D Earth ‘sales call’ to.  After a morning yoga class, a quick swim and sauna I began to plan my Williamsburg assault…pretty simple, first I’d go to the Bedford Cheese Shop then I’d reward myself with a sandwich at Saltie.  The Captain’s Daughter is all the rage with the press and really all the sandwiches, the entire menu of 7, seem to get their inspiration from each of our earthly continents. They are thoughtfully created and curated if you will.  I plunged, with way more restraint than anybody else in the tiny space, into the Spanish Armada, a perfectly made, chock full of potato Spanish tortilla on a half foot square of fresh focaccia topped with pimentón aioli. I cut the sandwich in half, Dvoured one half sitting at the counter and wrapped up the other half wich,(I like the pun here) I savored at home while researching how to make a Spanish tortilla. Knowing what I know now I’ll want a flotilla behind me in support of all the beautiful food I’m so inspired to make with these downright simple, earth bound foods.

My recipe yields are for 1-2 people as they’re usually tests. Most recipes call for twice the ingredients I work with.

Spanish Tortilla

You’ll need:

A non-stick pan, potatoes, salt, oil, eggs, onion, aioli or mayo and paprika. I forgot to include the bottle of oil in this picture.

Most recipes call for 6-7 potatoes, any potato will do, russet, Idaho, Yukon, Bliss, to 5 eggs. I used about 1 pound of small, tri-colored roasting potatoes I had around, half an onion diced and 3 eggs.

The technique to how the potatoes are cut I think is key. Cut the potato in half, length-wise. With the flat side down on a cutting surface, slice across the top of the potato halves slices that are about 1/8” thick.  No normal person would slice potatoes the size I used and truth be told, regular white potatoes look nicer and are far easier to work with. The tri- colored potatoes look exciting in the photos.

The onion is diced.

There are a number of cooking techniques that make a Spanish tortilla all that it is and not just a potato omelet.

1.   The sliced potatoes and diced onions are salted.

2.   You cook the potatoes and onions in a good amount of oil.

3.   They are then added to hand beaten or whisked eggs.

4.   Mix the cooked potatoes, onions and egg mixture and pour this into the non-stick pan you cooked the potatoes, onions in.

A few recipes call for up to 2-3Cs of oil.  I used just enough oil to cover the potato, onion mixture when spread evenly over the bottom of the pans surface. Cook the potatoes, onions until they can be split with a fork or spoon.

I then added the cooked potatoes, onions and oil to the beaten eggs. I mixed this well then poured it back into the pan that I melted about 1 Tablespoon of goat butter on to.

A trick I learned is that the 1st minute of cooking time with the egg, potato, onion mixture must be very hot for the egg to not stick. It’s strange but no matter how much oil, and recipes call for only a thin coating of oil at this point the eggs should not stick. Then you can cook the tortilla over a medium high heat until you see the edges pull away from the side of the pan. The middle will still be runny but when you can lift a side up and get a spatula well under it, it’s time to do the ol flip-a-roo Don’t fear it. Place a dinner plate over the top of the pan, stand over the sink and flip.

Put the pan back on the stove, heat for 20-30 seconds and slide the tortilla back into the pan. Cook this for another 3-4 minutes, turn off the heat and let it sit for about 2 minutes before flipping it back onto a serving plate.

It’s highly likely the tortilla will split on the first flip. Worry not this is not the ‘presentation side’ and and once the tortilla is back in the pan all mistakes seem to work themselves out.

The creme de la creme here is not the crema Catalana that I tried to make but the pimentón aioli. Fortunately it can be made quickly by adding paprika to good quality mayonnaise. I look forward to making the pimentón aioli from scratch. This is a true delicacy.

IMG_4469

 

Share This:

Dec 182011
 

Karashi-Mentaiko/Spicy Pollock Roe in cream sauce over angel hair pasta

If the title hasn’t intimidated or scared you away, you’re a special one and we’ll be rockin on. I’m thrilled to share a fabulous dish that takes minutes to cook and costs less than $3 per serving.

Hiroko, the woman I work with, told me she made her daughter’s favorite dish the other night because she won a Naginata championship. Katie is a champion in various Japanese marshal arts but Naginata is her absolute passion.

“So what’s Katie’s favorite dish” “Karashi Mentaiko, it’s spicy codfish roe in a cream sauce over angel hair pasta.” Now I did a full body spin around and said, “Wait, I love that dish. I order something like that at Typhoon, the hugely popular Japanese lounge in the E. Village. (which only recently is no longer)

Hiroko tells me the dish is so easy to make and it takes no time at all.  Inspired by her instructions and her daughter’s taste buds I was determined to make the dish myself. Later that afternoon I joined Hiroko on her weekly grocery-shopping trip to Sunrise Mart, the Japanese specialty Mart in the E.Village, so she could show me exactly which codfish roe to use. It’s called Karashi-mentaiko in Japanese.  For English-speaking-me: spicy Pollock roe. I paid $7.50 for a package with 2 large pieces/sacs of the Karashi-Mentaiko.

I was tripped up by one of the ingredients Hiroko used because I don’t typically cook with cream or milk for that matter. Then I thought to myself, I have fabulous whole milk yogurt from Trader Joes, I’m gonna try and make it with that.

If it weren’t for the somewhat tedious exercise of scraping the roe out of the very thin membrane sacks the roe is in and the 9-10 minutes it takes to cook dried spaghetti or 3-4 minutes for angel hair, this dish would honestly take no more than 5-6 minutes to prepare. A new SpecialD for sure

removing karashi from membrane sacks

.

WHAT YOU’LL USE

1/4# – Angel hair or spaghetti – Use organic pasta that is made from semolina, whole durum wheat. I suggest no longer using enriched pasta.

2 sacks of spicy Pollack roe, (Karashi mentaiko or non spicy is called tarako)

2 T butter or olive oil

2 t Tamari or soy sauce – optional

2 T – cream or whole milk yogurt

For Garnish:

Dried nori cut into thin strips, scallion slices, chiffonade shisho leaf, an edible leaf in the basil & mint family, alfalfa or radish sprouts

WHAT YOU’LL DO:

Bring 5-6 quarts of salted water to a rolling boil.

While the water is coming to a boil, slit the roe sac length wise and scoop the roe out with a spoon onto a plate. Discard the membrane.

In a saucepan over a medium heat, add the olive oil or melt the butter, add the tamari or soy sauce. Turn the heat off and mix in the roe and whisk to break up any clumping of the roe.

This is where I substituted the yogurt for cream. I used about 2 heaping Tablespoons and whisked everything together, making a lovely sauce.

At about this time the water should have come to a rolling boil. Add the desired amount of pasta and cook until your desired tenderness. If you’re using angel hair 3 minutes is perfect. If you’re using standard spaghetti, 9 – 10 minutes. Reserve at least 1/2 C of the cooking liquid. drain the pasta and add it to the pan of codfish roe sauce immediately – still dripping from the cooking liquid is fine .  Stir in the sauce pan to coat the pasta well.

Place in bowls and garnish with any of the suggested toppings or anything you may choose or have around.

Enjoy. It’s Dlicious, it’s Dlightful, its Delctable.

Share This:

Nov 272011
 

I was invited to the Harvest Festival at The Sylvester Manor http://sylvestermanor.wordpress.com/on Shelter Island one of the most glorious weekends this year.

About a dozen or so EZ-UP, pop-up tents, manned by local vendors and food artisans offered up various delicacies from smoked turkey or brisket sandwiches, brick oven grilled pizza, all organic – kale, sweet potato & chic pea style soups and coleslaw to local wines, squashes, and Sylvester Manor eggs, husk tomatoes, breads, flower wreaths and cutting boards. The tents lined one edge of the farm’s ‘center field’ where a small stage was platform to a number of folk acts that played the last few hours of the weekend’s festivities.

My friend’s blanket was laid out just to the right of the EZ-UP tent where the ‘sound board’ was in the center of the ‘center field’.  As we were finishing lemonades and kettle chips and getting into our sweatshirts as the warm sun set for the day another friend showed up w/a brown paper bag half full of husk tomatoes, grown on The Sylvester Manor farm. No sooner had he sat down when I had one of these yellow marble sized morsels pinched from it’s husk in my mouth. OOoos, ahas and yums drifted and filled our space as hands of adults and kids dove into that bag with little restraint.

Husk Tomatoes or Ground Cherries look like a mini heirloom tomatoes but taste like a cherry and tomato mixed into one bite. Pretty Dlectable if you ask me. Immediately I thought to myself, “this would make one killer tomato jam.” One of my all time favorite delicacies.

Concerned that the two pint baskets I got would yield very little I thought adding my next favorite delicacy, Peppadews, would bulk up the yield while also adding so much to the flavor and body of the jam on a whole.

After photographing these most gorgeous and interesting husk tomatoes or ground cherries I got that sauce pot out.

What I used:

2-3 T of olive oil – enough to coat the bottom of a pot with a thin coat of oil.

1T of red pepper flakes and 1 T mustard seeds

2-3 good sized garlic dents – minced & sliced

2 baskets of Husk Tomatoes – husked & washed – some cut in half

6-8 Peppadews – sliced and 1/4 C of their liquid

1/2″ ginger root – finely grated

2T tomato paste, 1-2 T sugar and or maple syrup.

What to do:

Add the red pepper flakes, mustard seeds, garlic and ginger to the olive oil heating over a medium to low heat to infuse the oil with these savory flavors. Then I added the washed husk tomatoes and the sliced Peppadews and their liquid. Stir well, lower the heat.

When I tasted the mixture at this point it was really hot, spicy hot, so to take it down a bit I added the juice of a small wedge of lime, about 2T of sugar and a good swirl of Maple syrup.  I also added some freshly ground nutmeg*

Nutmeg is hardly a staple ingredient but I keep it around because a sangha member who’s authored a book on natural healing mentioned my using nutmeg when he noticed I was trying to suppress my cough during a dharma teaching. I also store my mini grater in the bottle I keep the nutmeg in and thought of it when I looked for it to add the ginger – which I think is a must ingredient for this recipe.

This Husk Tomato/Ground Cherry Jam is fabulous as a topping on baked potatoes, scrambled eggs, on buttered toast of any kind, and any protein.

Share This:

Aug 282011
 

Dear friends, the frenzy to forage for food and running to the market as an emergency situation looms and standing on a line that wraps around the perimeter of a supermarket I think is downright foolish.  If we follow my simple theory about the importance to “maintain basic staples” we’d all be in much better shape even under non emergency conditions. We’ll be proactive and not reactionary.

So lets look at what non perishable foods to keep around. The first item that leaps to my mind is GRANOLA.  I’m also totally into this new food item I just came across called GLAD CORN. It’s over sized half popped corn kernels, all organic of course. Dried fruits and nuts, especially almonds are great to have around. I have two packages of Kame rice crackers and a tin or two of fine fish, sardines in olive oil or mackerel. Certainly beans & grains are important to keep around. Quinoa is my favorite due to it having zero salt and fats while being very high in protein.

I’m gearing up to shoot a Recipe$ 4 $urvival episode during the hurricane.  The dish I’m  going to make is far from seasonal but it will be OH SO GOOD.  I’m going to make sugar plum grape tomato and vidalia onion RISOTTO.  Stay tuned.

Here’s to cooking up a storm.

X OMe, FoodD

Share This:

Jul 052011
 

The waning warmth of the summer sun, the lengthening of our shadows and red tipped leaves brought out my compulsion for beautiful healthy food.

I prepared some of the most healthy foods with very little fuss or complicated cooking techniques which allowed the nutritional value of the ingredients to shine and work their magic.

The goodDs I picked up from Commodities included: KALE, sweet potato, quinoa, brussels sprouts, 2 large onions and a large carrot

The first thing I did was to get the sweet potatoes cooking = roasting. Wash the skin. pierce the potato all over with a fork about six, to a dozen times, toss in a 375 degree oven. It was about 30 minutes into their cooking time that I began to smell their sweet almost burnt caramel aroma. I turned the heat off at 45mins but left them in the oven.

Next, I prepped and cooked the brussels sprouts. Very simple. A few tough outer leaves or petals of the brussels sprout should be taken off or they’ll fall away. Slice the tough stem off the bottom of the sprout. I steamed them whole and then cut them into quarters. My friend thought they were perfectly cooked

It was funny, The quinoa turned out to be a fishes and loaves scenario. I had less than 1/2 a C of red quinoa so I mixed it with 1/2 C of couscous. Surprisingly they cooked well together and I ended up with a pot full of goodness, more than 4 hefty portioned servings – perfectly cooked. Ooo, right, I tossed a handful of golden raisins into the ‘mix’.

With the sweet potatoes cooked off I put them into the refrigerator. I think this was really smart because when I sliced the potatoes they sliced perfectly and the skin pulled away effortlessly.

Dig in, savor, – Cook,steam,bake, saute, spend less using seasonal ingredients and you’ll feel better while fine tuning your mindful and resourceful nature.

Cook and share.
OMe,
FoodD

Share This:

May 172011
 

When I first made this meal and video I called the piece ‘Colorful Meal’ but as I look at it now and begin to write this piece I’m gonna call it what I have, THE COMPLIMENTING COMPLEMENTARY MEAL.

The dish is complementary because the colors and textures are opposing and harmonizing while also being complimentary because it is flattering and gracious and when I typed the word complementary I spelled it with an I and noticed the synonyms were not the synonyms of the complementary I wanted but now I’m off on the subtle difference in the spelling of the word(s) which compliment each other – Let’s get on with it awreaD.

Clearly it’s the colors of the raw materials that got me going, the red/orange of the salmon, the green of the watercress and pea puree and the yellow of the creamed corn. There are so many ways to take this dish over the top so let’s consider this a strong foundation for always serving and whipping up complementary dishes, I say here’s to juxtaposition on a plate!

At first you would think the watercress & pea puree and creamed corn are complimentary, meaning too much alike but I think the dish works on a whole. I think steamed carrot or a thick slice of a warm, sun-ripened, farm fresh eastern LI tomato off set on the plate would certainly also add to the dish.

The first thing I made was the CREAMED CORN

Dice and sauté an onion. Add 2 Tablespoons of olive oil or the equivalent of butter SIDE NOTE I happen to have butter around, which I RARELY do but I was making and testing recipes for scones like a crazy person for one of my ParTEAS™ which I held and hosted at The Ivy Brown Gallery last month. to the sautéed onions then sprinkle with flour. Now you’re making a roux. Add milk and you’re making a white sauce. Add the corn and some water, mix and let cook. Now you’ve got creamed corn.

If you have cornstarch, you’d make a slurry of cornstarch and water and add this to the corn, onions and milk and again, have yourself creamed corn.

I poured the creamed corn mixture into a blender and gave it a quick blend. If one has a Cuisinart you’d give the creamed corn mixture a quick PULSE.

Next I brought well-salted water to a boil for the WATERCRESS & PEA PUREE

Add Peas to the boiling salted water. I used 1 cup of peas to one bunch of watercress. Recipes I read call for twice this, 2 Cs of Ps and 2 bunches of H2Ocress.
Once the water has come back to a boil and the Peas have floated to the top, turn of the heat and add the watercress. Let the watercress wilt for 5 minutes in the salted boiled water with the Peas.

While the Peas and H2Ocress were cooking I cleaned out the pan I made the creamed corn in and PAN SEARED AND POACHED THE SALMON

Get a nonstick pan hot. Pinch some Salt of D Earth into the hot pan and add enough olive oil to coat the bottom of the pan, slices from a good sized garlic clove and a squeeze of 1/2 a juicy lemon. If you have some white wine, black pepper corns, a bay leaf, any of this helps, just COOK YOUR SALMON. I cooked my salmon steak for about 4 minutes on each side with a top on the pan so I was actually also poaching the salmon You may want to cook your salmon in a soy sauce?

Again, pan searing and or poaching?? COMplementary cOMplimentary.

You should be done by now and reaDy to plate.

Get on with it. Dig in. Aren’t you starving?

Much
LO
VE,
FoodD

You can also find Me on youtube via this link: http://www.youtube.com/recipes4survival
or
by clicking the YOUTUBE link on the menu bar.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Share This: